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be respected. from the white man he was president from university of mish station michigan. the secretary of labor thought he was a moderate i read all of the white house files i did not just serve on the commission i got all the files and we had all of it so we could see inside though one lone black guy in the eisenhower white house the listlessly to have names to a point* people he said he will not get in trouble making him do it. but there was the a professor from motor dame another important figure 57 mary frances berry when did you serve as tear? >>guest: i came to the commission in 1980 after serving in the carter administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes.
$25 million to the university of michigan to build a state-of-the-art facility, the kohl center. since elected in 1988, herb kohl has been a champion for public education fighting to give students the tools they need to succeed in the modern workforce. he's made fighting crime in wisconsin and across the nation a priority, advancing investments in antidrug and antigang programs. he's worked to reduce juvenile crime and ensure private funding of state and local public agencies. he's been a strong voice for the wisconsin dairy farmers, a valued member of the judiciary committee, banking kph-lt, -- committee and the special committee on aging and done so much for the aging population in america today. he's been a leader in many different legislative initiatives. herb cole is a fine man, a wonderful human being, i so admire and appreciate him. he's a distinguished senator, a devoted representative to the people of wisconsin and his presence will be missed in the senate. i wish him the very, very best in his retirement. would the chair announce the business of the day. the presiding officer
be respected, they put the chairman who is the president to michigan state university in east lansing. he was made the president of it. that one black member, a guy named wilkins who was assistant secretary of labor than they thought he was a sort of moderate person. i read all the white house files by the way. i didn't serve on the commission, but since i'm an historian i got all the files from other presidents, all the white houses and that all that stuff so i could see what they were saying inside about what they were doing. so the 11 black guy who was an adviser in the eisenhower white house, who is mostly there to tell names of people they could appoint something that would give them the trouble with their job. name him to it. but the rest of the folks on their named father ted hasbrouck from notre dame and important figures so it had important people on it. >> host: mary frances berry, when did she serve as chair of the civil rights commission? >> guest: i came in 1980 after having served in the carter administration and after then chancellor university of colorado boulder, where pe
of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
in michigan, democratic caller. go ahead. >> caller: yes. i have a two-part question. i was wondering, for one, i'm going to be retiring here in another 12 years but i'm not going to have social security until probably the age of 70. i'm 50 now. and i was wondering, right now if i was to lose my job for some unforeseen reason, i will lose my benefits. i have the option, as an employee to keep my benefits at a about $800 cost. but when senators and congressman step out of their position, i'm not mistaken, they still have their insurance for life. and then the second part of the question, that i am posing is, i believe they are going to get a 3% pay raise every year and i have never seen in my lifetime them stop that. i was wondering if that is something could be possibly done? >> host: isabel sawhill. >> guest: i assume what you're talking about is that if you were to lose your job you would lose your benefits, you mean primarily your health care benefits. and you're right. you would lose them. under the affordable care act once it is implemented in 2014, that would enable you to go on an excha
of monroe, michigan, would be one of the most prominent. he's buried at west point, has a gravestone there. there is a forest named after him, a county, a high school, a city. there are many memorials of custer that keep his name alive c-span: when did you first get interested in him? >> guest: my first visit to the battlefield, i think, in 1990. it's simply a place, i think, that draws you in, because it's still very unspoiled in terms of the way that it was at the time that the battle took place. you get a sense of the a kind of desolation, this rugged terrain which the troopers had not been familiar with. it's simply a setting that has a certain amount of power. c-span: what does little bighorn stand for? >> guest: it's simply a very small river that runs through that area. and there are bighorn mountains there's a bighorn river, and this is a smaller river, tributary river. c-span: exactly what happened on that day in the afternoon? >> guest: ok. custer, very early in the morning of that day, believed that the indians who were gathered in that valley which he had not yet seen, but ther
. the presiding officer: the senator from michigan has asked to dispense with the quorum, but there is an objection. quorum call: the presiding officer: is there objection? mr. mccain: i ask for the yeas and nays on my amendment. sproeup is there a sufficient second? -- the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there does not appear to be a sufficient second. mr. mccain: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: i would ask to suspend the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. stabenow: i appreciate my colleague's consideration. i would like consent to speak in morning business. i ask unanimous consent to speak in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. stabenow: thank you very much. mr. president, i rise today as so many colleagues have done throughout the day to pay tribute to a tremendous colleague that we lost yesterday, a friend to all of us, someone that we have all learned a tremendous amou
to brownsville. everyone in this chamber will miss her. i know i speak for all of my colleagues when i michigan wish kay bailey -- when i wish kay billy hutchison the i have best in the next exciting chapter of her life. i join with my colleagues in saying to you, via condios. mr. hatch: mr. president, i want to join in thanking kay for her great service here in the united states snavment i've worked very closely with her on a wide variety of issues and i have to say there's no more fires advocate. in fact, i have to say that all of our women senators are fierce advocates and we've been greatly benefited by having them herement and kay has parved the way for -- has paved the way for autumn in of senators, both male and fe female, to become better senators. kay bailey hutch song is a great senator. she worked her guts out the whole time she was here -- and she's still here, but she's going to retire this time. and she represented texas well. and all i can say is that she's been my friend all this time, and when i needed help from her, she was always there. i tried to be there for her when she ne
it or not. i was born in flint, michigan. i went to law school and became a lawyer and clerk for justice powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fort
: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i rise today to bring attention a critically important piece of legislation that the senate has passed and that the house needs to pass immediately. it passed the senate with bipartisan support. there are those on both sides of the aisle in the house of representatives that support passing it and i'm here to urge in the strongest terms possible that the speaker bring this bill up before the house and get it passed. now, many people, because of my speaking in the past, may be i'm referring to the farm bill, which i also believe we need to have the house take up and pass, because of our bipartisan work, but i actually after referring today to the fact that we have only 27 days until we go over the fiscal cliff, or for middle-class families, what this means is 27 days before their taxes go up on average $2,200. so what we're talking about is the fact that we passed a bil bill -- we didn't just pass a bill. we passed a bill in july, july 25 of this year, the sen
legislative session. mr. levin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. order in the senate, please. the senator from michigan. mr. levin: we hope that cloture will be voted now. we've disposed of 119 amendments to this bill. i talked to the majority leader. and if we do vote cloture tonight, which of course senator mccain and i hope we will, we're still going to try to clear some additional amendments using the same process we've used up to now. and we would hope that we could clear some additional amendments right up to the time of final passage. we've asked the majority leader, hopefully we can get to final passage tomorrow at some point. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 hereby move to bring to a close debate on s. 3254 for fiscal year 2013 for military activities of the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. signed by 18 senators. the presiding officer: by unanimous consent, the mandatory quorum has been waived. the question is is it the sense of the senate that the debat
at that time. i took a look at it and when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met was modeled -- bob dole and we became good friends even to this day. i asked him what are your plans. and he, without hesitating, said i'm going to be a clerk. after that i'm going to run for the state house, first opening in the commerce. that's where i'm going. i figured that's a good idea. so i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor when the territorial losses became available i ran for that office and when the state could came along i got to congress a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you came here. >> two terms in the house and in the senate. >> and then came here as a member of the house and who did you come here without that time? >> only one member of that time. >> you mentioned senator dole and the fact you were then in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service. he talks about being a friend of -- excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpso
and in the meantime we are off to michigan where terryilynn is calling in. >>caller: i have been searching for this and i got it now on flex pay and a cheaper price. and free shipping and handling and it is half christmas to me. >>host: i like how you celebrate. >>host: have you been wanting tablet- >>caller: yes and i am disabled and it fits my budget. i could not 300 or $400.when i saw free shipping and handling i said oh this is mine. >>guest: >>host: suzanne amazon and did you know they give you a free atpp every day? --this is amazon >>caller: i can watch you all on it. you guys have made my year. >>host: that is important to me and aaron. it is really nice to be able to get the things that you will use and do it on flex pay and it will pay for itself 100 times over. >>caller: and the 5 flex pays fits right into my budget. >>host: thank you for stopping by to say hello to us at hsn. >>caller: thank you. i watch you every day but this is it for the year. >>host: have a safe and blessed holiday. >>caller: you and happy new year. bye-bye. >>host: here is the scoop. we are bu
? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. today i rise because middle-class families are counting on the house of representatives to do the right thing between now and the end of the year, which is just 19 days away for the house to pass the middle-class tax cuts that we sent them back in july. families need help. when we talk about fiscal cliff, the most important one is the -- what families are struggling with every day, and we only have 19 days until taxes on middle-class families go up by an average of $2,200 if the house of representatives doesn't act to make sure that 98% of the american public is protected from tax increases. as we know, we passed the middle-class tax cut act on july july 25. so far, the house has not acted. 19 days, they have 19 days until the end of this year in order to act. time is running out. country, a long-term plan for fiscal solvency and for our economy. and by the way, we'll never get out of debt with close to 12 million people out of work, so we better be focused on jobs and the economy as i am each and every d
is agreed to as modified. mr. levin: move to reconsider. the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: i move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. under the previous order, amendment numbered 3123 -- the senate will be in order. under the previous order, amendment numbered 3123 as modified is agreed to. the clerk will read the bill for the third time. the clerk: calendar 419, s. 3254, a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2013 for military activities, and so forth and for other purposes. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the question occurs on s. 3254 as amended. the senator from michigan. mr. levin: madam president, i will take but one minute. the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. go ahead. mr. levin: i will take but just one minute. i just feel so grateful and so proud that a tradition of our committee in this senate has been maintained. our 51st cost-effective defense authorization -- 51st consecutive defense authorization bill, a bill that is vitally important to our nation. i'm grateful to our colleagu
cases not so substantially change this bill. and i thank the senator from michigan for yielding just a minute. i know the senator from new york wants to respond as well. but generally i want to say i know the senator from oklahoma is very sincere. no one literally in this chamber has worked harder to try to put more reforms and eliminate duplication. but i want to just say one thing in response. when we have emergencies in this country like when we go to war, no one comes to the floor to debate how we're going to offset $1.4 trillion worth of expense for two wars, iraq and afghanistan. when we came to the floor a couple of years ago to vote for tax cuts, many of us claimed and said at the time there would not be enough known tkhoefrpl. we had to borrow money to do that. the other side sat quietly and didn't say a word. why is it when americans, when a building is blown up in oklahoma or when the levees break in louisiana or when the worst storm in 50 years comes we have to debate an offset? this bill is not going to be offset. it's going to pass, i hope. and i understand senator cobu
"the secret history of the universe revealed through a cult science in detroit, michigan." [laughter] which i almost used for my title, but then i -- [laughter] >> publishers were like, oh -- >> not into it. [laughter] just to tell the story very quickly, he ended up -- he and the entire family were brutally, you know, gruesomely murdered, beheaded, and, you know, his children killed as well, and it was a big sensational story at the time, and we can go through the free press archives and find all the coverage. it was never solved. at a certain point, i realizedded it was not far from where i was living over in eastern market. i walked there to check it out, and it's, you know, where the house was is just a field now. i just filedded that away, and then, yeah, weirdly enough, probably a year later, there was another murder, like, almost literally across the street. it was a drug thing, and these kids were trying to scare -- there were two rival drug houses in the town, and they were trying, you know, the two teenagers were trying to scare off the rival, and so to do this, they killed
to be united states district judge for the northern district of florida. terrence c.berg of michigan to be united states district judge for the eastern district of michigan. the presiding officer: under the previous order, there will be 15 minutes of debate divided in the usual form. the senior senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: thank you, mr. president. i ask unanimous consent to include my statements in the judicial nominees on the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. leahy: i ask unanimous consent to speak on my time without delaying the vote as if in morning business on another critical matter. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. leahy: mr. president, i have spoken on this subject many times on the floor. the people who are affected by violence against women wonder why the congress has delayed so on the violence against women reauthorization act, the bill we passed here in the senate. if violence -- if you're a victim of violence, you can't understand such delays. so i think it's time for the senate and the house to come together
in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole, and we became good friends, even to this day. and when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said, i'm going to be a county clerk. after that, i'm going to run for the state house. of course, first opening in congress, that's where i'm going. i figure that's a good idea. so i went to law school. i became assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and when stated came along, i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you became -- >> two terms in the house and part of a term in senate spent and then came here as a member of the house. and who did you come here with at that time? >> the house had one member. >> you mentioned senator dole, and the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, norma minetta talks about being a friend of, excuse me, the sender from wyoming, al simpson, and meeting him when he
on the university of michigan law school plan had been upheld into the very thing grutter v. bollinger that have followed the plan closely enough so the court was obliged to uphold it. even one justice, judge garza, who said he hated racial preference isn't about to strike them down said that he had no choice but to uphold this one has been under supreme court precedent. by the way, seven of the 16 justices disagreed and thought you could strike it down under the career precedent. so the case finds its way to the supreme court and it's likely to perhaps become the most important case in history on racial preferences. not so much because there's anything that extraordinary about this case, but the composition of the court has changed his 2003 cases which could be fairly green light to racial preferences, very large racial preferences as long as they're camouflaged beneath the kind of complicated, holistic thing. holistic is like the word or sprinkle holy water over preferences. so here's how it worked at the university of texas. they have an academic index for people outside the top 10%. they hav
and the michigan guard's the helicopter spotted their lifeless bodies in the trench and when i got there i immediately knew they were all gone but i didn't want to face it triet surely it can't be all of them, this can't be true so i checked each one of them for a pulse and i confirmed what i already knew. and then they were all together doing their job as they had sworn to do in the military as every man and woman does when they enlist. it's different to communicate to sewing sure you get the same amount so they recognize outstanding and courageous. but for me to be honest, it's on the exact opposit
level rather. riders will move from gray wolf. we will find a small house in michigan. do that digital backroads of a lot of writers to fall out of print at simon and schuster and random house because there is no value in that copyright at simon and schuster random house. so and they're fighting and playing. the relationship to the commercial field. we do appear review. so we actually look to the commercial world for their advice of oregon. we can use that advice to help our nonprofit. >> when i was at random house, one of the most distinguished. they invented. the couple hundred thousand. this particular occasion it was about 300,000. it was the history of the spanish inquisition. don't worry about that. well, that was really actually in the end of the book said he recommended. a very tricky publishing. in just a mention one instance. i have told books and the library association. towboats. night and day. and i said, let me argue with my chairman about weather every book should be publishable. it can't be both. a said, these books, tell me what profit there were. came back again. lost
into prime confident it will be but with university of michigan and other libraries storing millions of books, that they will be packed and i feel that resolution will happen because all of those works with those royalties are circulated through policy toward disgruntled. >> clap its conclude with the fare battles between the the u.s. between amazon and coucal but the intention of our founding fathers who understood the importance of a democracy is so with article brought back one to grant power not from line number three but the exclusive right to which is their language. but the founding fathers with states, a pate trends, universities and corporations that could compromise the independence of their work and did suggest a copyright would insure the first range to further guarantee a full range of perspectives in the marketplace of ideas. when i was 14, i also read a story that has stuck with me and comes back to me. a former and he would move little slow but he still made it. the farmer thought so far so good. i will keep cutting then and the horse would take them to market. just when the f
will. we will find a small house in michigan called sank to do the digital back list of a lot of writers who have fallen that it print at simon & schuster and random house because there is no value in that copyright at simon & schuster or random house. we are in there fighting and we are in there playing in and their relationship to the commercial field is arm's-length at best, but we do peer review to give our grants. we actually look to the commercial world for their vice fund where we are going in this new digital ground so we can use the device to help our nonprofit publishers. >> when i was a random house and jason epstein is one of the most distinguished and invaded -- when he was trying to tell me i often spent more than i thought was reasonable like a couple hundred thousand, while a lot of money. in this particular occasion it was around $300,000. he said, it was the history of the spanish requisition. he said this book will be around long after we are all dead. actually in the end all of the books he recommended actually were there in the end but it's tricky publishi
's arm of amputated, spent 21 months recooperating from the wounds in an army hospital in michigan. during that, he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young gi who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate being a soft powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashedded progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate, and in death, he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha, and it is with a heavy heart that i, we, bid aloha, good-bye, to a friend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condol
for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform including a 2001 book entitled the wages of sickness, the politics of health insurance, in progress of america at the university of north carolina. in her talk today she is going to speak about her latest book, the book titled is "health care for some". i have the feeling it is relevant to our times. the talk is entitled health care for all, women, activism and women's right to health. this is a history -- her book rather and her talk today will be partly, a history of rights and rationing in the united states from the great depression to the present, and the book just came out by the university of chicago press. i have seen copies of it lying around. vile accounts, beatrix hoffman has simply nailed this big historica
history of the universe as revealed through occult science in detroit, michigan. i almost used that for my title. he ended up he and his entire family were brutally gruesomely murdered. they were be headed, his children were killed as well, and it was a big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and find all this coverage and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living so i walked over to check it out and where his house was, so i filed that way and we're the enough, probably a year later there was another murder almost literally across the street. it was a drug thing and these kids were trying to -- their ridge two rival drug houses, they were trying -- these two teenagers were trying to scare off radicals and to do this they ended up killing and then dismembering this guy and scattering body parts around literally across the street from this other murder. again, that was history repeating itself in a way that i found fascinating. i went to the trial and i don't normally cover murder trials. sort of -- i don'
very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i tried to help them out when they were looking for a vice presidential candidate. i did a phone call to the cuisine diversity if engine doll or haley were put on the ticket republicans could entice voters who would l
're just doing it the way the university of michigan law school did it, and so we're okay. there are a number of distinctions between the cases, though, that we think will help the, you know, the now-more skeptical about racial preferences court strike down tease preferences. they wouldn't have to overrule the grutter case to do so, because the grutter case justice o'connor articulated some principles that were supposed to limit the size and duration of racial preferences to avoid abuses, but she department really enforce them. -- she didn't really enforce them. but they remain on the books. you're supposed to pursue race-neutral alternatives before you resort to race. well, texas did. they have this 10% plan. they get a lot of racial diversity and other diversity from the 10% plan. did they really need to use individual racial preferences on top of it? that's one argument in her favor. another argument is the court has said no racial balancing, meaning you cannot try to mirror in your state's university's composition the racial proportions of the statewide population. tha
counterweight hezekiah spent a lot of time with, john dingell, democrat from michigan has been serving since 1955 and previous to him, his father served in the same congressional district until his father died and his son ran and took his place. dingell used to be thought of as liberal. no to think of him as a liberal now. democrats don't because they marginalize him. they didn't find him liberal to keep them on as chairman of the all powerful commerce committee. i show it to you that even with democrats than it can already, even being removed from the pecking order of power is able to get things done. this one-of-a-kind us how to pull strings on behalf of this district and get parts appropriated, to get bills passed. he passed his pipeline safety bill come essentially regulation bill during the tea party congress almost unheard of. but t-tango is a think a dying breed. his philosophy is to govern from the center. he began writing a bill, which means to bring everybody on board and get them in a room and talk about what they would like. it's not the way of works in today's zero-sum politics
dingell, democrat from michigan and he has been serving since 1955. previouslpreviousl y his father sanded -- served in the same congressional district until his father died in the sun ran and took his place. dingell is, used to be thought of as illiberal and no one thinks of him as a liberal and certainly the democrats don't because they marginalize him. and yet thank you has proven and i show it throughout the book that even with the democrats in the minority and even with him being removed from the pecking order power, they want to get things done. this why the guy knows how to pull strings on behalf of the district to get parts appropriated to get bills passed and he passed his pipeline safety bill which is essentially a regulation bill during the tea party congress. it's almost unheard of, but dingell is i think a dying breed. his philosophy is, you govern from the center. you begin writing a bill from the center which means you bring everybody on board, put them in a room and talk about what they like. it's not the way it works in today zero some policy where their idea now the rep
states of michigan and missouri in the procurement. and as a result of that procurement, a new manufacturer that is chosen to locate in the state of illinois, because governor quinn actually aggressively went after that manufacture before it was even known that they would be building any rail cars for this initiative, nepa located their facility in rochelle illinois and have higher 250 people and that is from nothing. we weren't competing with other states. those jobs are new jobs to the united states, new jobs to illinois. so that's cleared a success story. that facility also is making some transit cars for metro which is suburban chicago fixed rail system for commuters. so that is a big success story. and i think i talked briefly about normal illinois. my comments, normal illinois is home to illinois state university, and that in illinois is the station with the second highest ridership, second only to chicago. and that's because they have built this wonderful station to they use tiger funds to build the station. that is a station that connects the riders getting off of the t
from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, madam president. the presiding officer: we are in a quorum call. ms. stabenow: i would ask suspension of the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. stabenow: thank you. madam president, i rise today to once again speak about the fact that in july -- july 25 of this year, the senate passed a middle-class tax cut bill guaranteeing that the first $250,000 of income that any american has would be exempted from any tax increase. now, we all know that the vast majority -- in fact, 98% of americans -- make less than that amount of money. so we are talking about 98% of americans receiving tax cuts under that proposal. back in july, we passed this proposal, and it is now still waiting in the house of representatives. so far the house leadership has refused to even let the bill come up for a vote, even though we all know that there are a majority of members in the house that would vote for this and guarantee that, as we go into christmas, middle-class families across america would know that they would have $2,200 in their pocket, more in
. >>host: like gary from michigan who called he said i have been thinking about getting a tablet computer, one of those $500 and jobjobsthis has unlimited memory he said for $40 of i do not like it i will send it back. that is why we have thousands of new shoppers. if you do not love it if it is a gift even for yourself i love how you guys shoppe because that is how i shopbuy it for yourself but try it. if you are not blown away put the return label on the box and send it back. we will refund your purchase price. not a store in america who wants haggle? a lot of times you have until january 31stfirst? we give you until january 31st.the bottom line is you are going to love it and use it and wonder how you ever lived without it. but you do not let somebody else get kindle.your can polkindle. $25 of simply to impress, the usb cable to charge through your computer or you could get an adapter to plug-in to your wall, stylus earbuds remember it is more durable than the plastic toys your kids are playing with.20 times more durable than plastic and it only weighs 14 ounces. 9 hour battery, do it.
was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role in right wing anti-communist populist politics in the late '50s and early 1960s. it's one of the thing
won big. but he had a fire wall in ohio and wisconsin and michigan and illinois and iowa where the auto rescue gave white working-class people, men and women, a sense that government was on their side and could do something for them and their families that government hadn't done for a long time. i think part of the story of the migration of white working-class people from the democratic party in all honesty is not that they went and become the party of black people which is what some white people think that it was also they stopped being the party of government and the party that makes positive changes in the lives of average people and started cozying up to big business and particularly becoming the party of wall street. i think we can learn. i am not saying we will have an auto rescue where we will go around and have government intervention in every sector of the economy but what mitt romney laid out in his remarks to disappointed donors a few days ago is very interesting. president obama didn't talk about white people or the auto bailout which is very interesting. probably a
concerned about the labor moment. >> oh, yes. >> during the '30s -- >> in michigan. >> exactly. that my point. >> in the 1930s is a key, very threatening moment, and during the strikes strikes of world wad strikes -- the miner strikes and tremendous dissatisfaction right after the war in the '45-'46 period. goes all through film noir and this not convenience for the bosses and elite to look -- to deflect the tension that exists in the american life by pointing to stalin and the communists and saying, this is -- >> of course. >> this is the enemy. >> of course, the red scare was a scare against the communist party which was declining quickly, after 1948, progressive party. debacle lost, and thus the cold war. but at the same time the american right and the american corporate interests used that fear to turn people against labor, at the same time without denying that -- when the soviets -- in europe, take away democracy,. >> where is the energy? the energy is in the united states. stop these strikes. stop labor. and i think that the stalin -- always been a convenient distraction for the r
president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: madam president, i understand now under the existing unanimous consent agreement that we are going to be proceeding to debate a judge. i would ask unanimous consent that immediately after the disposition of that nomination that i be the first democratic senator recognized when we return to the pending trade bill. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 676, which the clerk will report. the clerk: nomination, michael p. shea of connecticut to be united states district judge. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: madam president, the senate is finally being allowed to vote today on the nomination of michael shea to be a district judge in the united states district court for district -- the district of connecticut. it has taken a long time for this day to come but he will be confirmed, and i congratulate him and his family on his confirmation and i congratulat
didn't match. in michigan, if you don't have photo i.d., you still should be able to vote if you sign an david -- affidavit attesting you're the person. that's not an option that is often given to the vote, and even if the voter asks for it, there's resistance. so we had a number of problems with that. virginia there was confusion with people around i.d. because you have a new law that went into effect where you had multiple forms of i.d. we got reports of people were being told they had to show a photo i.d. so, in texas, during early vote there was confusion about the i.d. requirement. didn't get as much of that on election day in texas. we didn't hear as many reports in south carolina to be hospital about been cows about that we thought we would. so it was mixed. it affect the entire progression because it created confusion about what was required to vote and what wasn't. that was definitely an impact we saw. >> i think we might not agree on this one but maybe. >> yeah. i guess at least from the voter i.d. stuff, anything we can do to make sure to minimize voter fraud is bett
the honorable gentleman from michigan, mr. dingell, for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. my commendations for in this hearing. and we need to do what we are doing, and i commend you for that. these questions will be yes or no. first to chairman genachowski. mr. chairman, section 6403b of the spectrum act requires the commission to coordinate with canada and mexico when authorizing the reassignment and reallocation of beside cast frequencies -- broadcast frequencies. is that correct? >> yes. >> mr. chairman, i would note that similar such coordination took place for the dtv transition and that it took a very long time. is that correct? >> yes. >> mr. chairman, will the commission commit to negotiating new arrangements with the state department, canada and mexico as mentioned in paragraph 34 of the commission's notice of proposed rulemaking before repacking broadcast frequencies, yes or no? is. >> i'm not sure of that provision, but we are committed to working with canada and mexico. >> is that a yes or no? >> i'd have to look at that provision to give an accurate answer. >> t
to adopt the so-called michigan -- essentially when an error or an outcome, an unexpected outcome takes place that is related to an error, there is immediate apology and a very rapid resolution potentially with some financial compensation. and that arrangement the option of going to a lawsuit remains but pursuing a lawsuit drops radically. >> is sometimes called the time sorry model. next question? yes. >> my name is cooper and i'm with -- i am taking up on dr. patel's mention. in the context of the exchange question that was raised, it seems to me, i shouldn't say simple, but the available solution for addressing many of these problems particularly from a -- point of view is centralization. the premise of his book was to associate every time of profit in the country and to community hospitals, medical schools, community centers and to use the leverage of that collected to move beyond the spider legs at that table to the supply led to the information technology leg, is to the insurance leg and instead of being on the defensive, which as david cay johnston's critique of the good guys in
they took him to in michigan, senator inknew -- senator ininouye, two phones, bob dole, and the republican nominee for president of the united states, and this other lifetime friend is senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate,, a massive senate office building named after him. senator said in his usual calm manner, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. congressional gold medal. highest honor congress can bestow, the distinguished service cross, bronze star for valor, and of course, a purple hurt. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress as he displayed on the battle field. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting i had -- i mentioned it briefly last night, but it was ten days. i knew that senator inouye was not feeling well, so i went down to his office, and he has a remarkable office. it's a beautiful office. but there isn't one single frame on the wall depicting what great man he is. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his
level. we saw last week the state of michigan adopted a new law that gave workers the freedom not to join a union. now, they didn't do that because it was politically expedient or that they thought it was a good idea, because it actually is probably going to get a lot of the politicians in hot water in michigan. but what they did is looked at 23 other states who had adopted the same idea and saw that they were attracting businesses and creating jobs and these states without raising taxes had more revenue to build schools and roads and hospitals. it was just an idea that worked. it's not a political idea to give people the freedom not to join a union. it's an american idea. and it's an idea that works. we can look around the country today, and, again, we make these things political and give them labels that are good or bad, depending on i guess which party you're in, but we know a number of states have been real innovative and creative with what they're doing to in education. we've seen what they've done in florida to create more choices, and louisiana particularly, forced by h
scoring based upon race. if they do that, they might run afoul of the michigan problem. assigning numbers to it, which creates another type of problem. it is possible that ms. fisher might have been admitted to a summer program under which texas and that the number of people who are not admitted to regular programs. it's not clear to me whether she actually tried to get into that program. in any event, she was not actually admitted it. one of the arguments that she made is it is impossible to reconstruct what would've happened. and that maybe this is a lawsuit which could prevent the university of texas from going forward with this program in the future. the problem from ms. fisher's perspective is she has already completed the university. this is not a class action. she has not sought an injunction against future use of the program because she would have no standing. the only thing she is seeking at this time is monetary damages. the damages she has claimed as far as i am aware that she paid an application fee of $100 or something of that range. and she wants that feedback. we are not cl
michigan the rest of the world that britain has strong and decisive government. and i'm grateful to my liberal democrat colleagues have helped me in this, and i hope both liberal democrats and conservatives celebrate the increase in the personal allowance. there are many conservatives who also wanted to achieve that. is also something of course liberal democrats -- shows we're helping working people even in these very difficult times. >> some of the positive impacts of this -- including saving people increase in their electricity bills, extension of the carbon price floors, and the 135 million pounds of capital spending. but i ask the chancellor this. given the rocky road is presented and the credibility he has on the markets, could he not find his way of borrowing more money for infrastructure projects to create jobs and keep people on the dole? >> counselor? >> first of all can i welcome the support is given to some of the measures we have taken to help the northern irish economy, and i'm well aware there are particular problems northern irish economy. the banking system which requir
? >> guest: that's a complicated question, and i can speak from my own experience. i live in michigan where i'm not permitted to marry, and, in fact, we are constitutionally prohibited to have heritage or similar yiewn your -- union purpose, the terrible language of our constitution. mark and i talked about getting married, say, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when
century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're looking at right now. those stockyards were part of the problem of getting the corn that america grows so well then and now, and it would each without utterly beknighted agricultural policies followed by until federal government with subsidizing -- that was a pleatly unnecessary aside -- completely unnecessary aside, i apologize for that. [laughter] originally, it was moved over vast distances in that quite tasty form of whiskey. we then moved to pigs which are, of course, corn with feet -- [laughter
. that is not a problem. [laughter] water flouration is something that was invented in 1945, grand rapids, michigan. it is seen as one of the best public health triumphs because people who cannot go to the depptist, people who are poor -- dentist, people who are poor can at least get some flour i'd in their -- flour ride in their water. it's a great thing. 200 million americans get flour dated water. portland rejected this in 1980, and oregon subsequently ranked near the bottom in children's dental health. many portlanders treasure their city's quirk ri distinctiveness, said "the new york times," and i agree -- [laughter] being toothless is quirk ri and distinctive. and, basically, i'm not going to read this quote from "the new york times"esing but basically, a couple weeks ago the city counsel finally approved fluoridation to begin in 201. really, a round of applause for portland for joining the 20th century. i love portland. if you're going to san francisco, be sure the bring a plunger. low-flow toilets -- not san francisco's fault, actually signed into law by president george h.w. bush, bush 41
work on the end of the cold war. i have a book i'm working on, with the university of michigan press, on the breakdown of detente in the '70s. it's the same time period as this book--much of this book. but now i think there'll be a reagan to--dimension to it where there wasn't one before. but to keep doing my research, teaching. it hasn't changed my goals at all. c-span: any--any interest in getting into a government situation at some point and being involved in foreign policy? >> guest: not necessarily, maybe on a--in doing some consulting, but not as a full-time job. there's just too much to do in the archives. c-span: our guest has been kiron skinner. she is a co-editor of "reagan in his own hand: the writings of ronald reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for america." thank you very much for joining us. >> guest: thank you. >> with the month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end list of notable books. booktv will feature several of these less focusing on nonfiction selections. these titles were included in "time" magazine's top 10 nonfiction
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